White Bean Hummus

PinExt White Bean Hummus

Hummus is pretty popular in the States. When I was home this summer, I went to the supermarket and was amazed by all the different blends and varieties of hummus. And some of them were advertising it as a Greek product. That seems a little funny to me since in the whole 2 1/2 years I have lived in Greece, I have only found it once in a Thessaloniki shop (and probably in Athens too). It is not common to find pre-made hummus packages, and it is has also not been popular among the Greeks I have been sharing a table with.

Hummus is much more commonly found in Greece’s more middle eastern neighbor, Turkey. A typical Greek recipe using chickpeas is called “Revithia” and is a soup like dish that is slowly cooked in the oven for many hours. I first tasted this from my mother-in-law during fasting times, and I was completely astonished how delicious this turned out. No cheese, no meat, no oil even – simply some water, salt, tomatoes, and a couple bay leaves. That is why I am constantly amazed by Greek cuisine, the most simple and humble meals come to life and nurture you to the bone!

I do like hummus however, and I came across this recipe a while back that made hummus out of navy beans. This recipe claimed to be better than the traditional method of using chickpeas/garbanzo beans.

hummus plate White Bean Hummus

Hummus is a pretty healthy snack filled with protein and fiber; it is also very filling even when eaten with just veggies. I wanted to find out if this recipe was all that it claimed to be: smoother, creamier, and easier to make. You see, chickpeas have a skin that should be removed while boiling, but navy beans (that for some reason are actually white) do not need to shed their coat, skipping one less step in the process. Of course many steps can be skipped if you live in America and can find canned beans! Here in Greece, we have only canned kidney beans and on the occasion you can find canned black beans or pinto beans for around 3 euros a can = $4.68 icon smile White Bean Hummus I say you are better off to boil the crap out of your own beans and save the extra money for a coffee. Am I right or am I right?! hummus 3 White Bean Hummus

White “Navy” Bean Hummus Recipe: Makes 3/4 cup

Printable Recipe
1 cup cooked navy beans
1-2 T. tahini (sesame seed paste)
1-2 T. fresh lemon juice
1 T. olive oil + more for garnish
1 small garlic clove, pressed or minced
dash of salt
dash smoked or spicy paprika, optional 
pita wedges and veggie slices (carrots, cucumber, celery, ect) 
 
Add beans, tahini, lemon juice, oil, garlic, and salt to a food processor. Blend until smooth and well combined. Spoon out on a serving plate, drizzle with a little oil and top with paprika or other herb of choice. 
 
If you are going to use fresh beans, you will need to either soak your beans overnight (4-8 hours, or until doubled in size)  or quick boil them. To quick boil, add your washed and sorted beans to a medium pot with a tight fitting lid and cover at least 2 ” with boiling water. Place lid on pot and let rest 1 1 1/2 hours. Replace the water and boil again, reduce to a simmer, and cook until soft. It is best to use fresh, dried beans. The older and drier your beans are the harder and longer they will take to cook. If you suspect that you have older beans, add some baking soda to the boiling water. I also like to add a bay leaf sometimes while boiling, it gives a nice, subtle flavor. 
 
Of course you can substitute the navy beans for the traditional chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and following the same recipe accordingly. As a matter of fact, I encourage you to try them both!  You can also substitute for canned beans, just be sure to rinse them really well, you may also consider adding less salt since canned beans already contain sodium. 

hummus dip White Bean Hummus

Hummus is one of those recipes you can make your own very easily. If you like it spicy, add more garlic; if you want it more nutty, add more tahini; if you want it richer, add more olive oil, ect. I would personally suggest to go easy on the tahini at first, it can really over power the flavor.

Also try adding some roasted red peppers, chipotle seasoning, cilantro and tomatoes, or any other flavor buster you think sounds good!

It is such an easy and quick go to snack to have on hand for a pick-me-up or a last minute party tray idea!

Kali Orexi,

Jacquline

PinExt White Bean Hummus

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6 Responses to “White Bean Hummus”

  • [...] Greek 7 Layer Dip Recipe Serves 6-8  2 cups plain hummus* 2 cups tzatziki*  1 seedless cucumber, chopped 1 cup chopped tomatoes 1/2 red onion chopped or 3-4 green onions chopped 1/4-1/2 cup kalamata olives, chopped  6-8 oz. feta cheese, crumbled    Choose a flat, square or round serving dish about 8×8″ if possible – use shallow bowl if not. Simply spread the hummus, tzatziki, then evenly distribute the cucumber, tomato, feta, onion, and olives. Let refridegerate 10-20 minutes if time allows. Serve with pita wedges or pita chips.   Homemade Hummus [...]

  • [...] from Seemingly Greek Share this:Share Tags: baking soda, boiling water, food processor, garlic clove, hummus recipe, [...]

  • Eddie DuBose:

    I’m making Easter hummus today. Really I’m making hummus, but its almost Easter so therefore its Easter hummus. Do I have to have a food processor? Or can I use those two round things that go really fast and you can lick them afterwards? Would that be okay?

    • HA… YOU MAKE ME SMILE :) IT WOULD BE BETTER IF YOU HAD A FOOD PROCESSOR, IT WILL BE SMOOTHER AND CREAMIER. BUT I GUESS IF ALL YOU HAVE IS THOSE TWO THINGS THAT GO REALLY FAST AND YOU LICK THEM AFTER (ALSO KNOWN AS A HAND MIXER) YOU COULD TRY THAT AS WELL! LET ME KNOW HOW IT TURNS OUT. (Sorry, just realized my caps lock was on, I was not yelling at you ;)

  • Tia:

    That’s really interesting about hummus not being big over there. I wished I knew about your Mother-in-law’s recipe, Revithia, when I attended Melkite Greek Catholic Church years ago. Those vegan fastings times were tough.

    When I make my hummus with dried beans (chickpeas or black beans), I presoak overnight with a little of baking soda (we have hard water). Then I cook them in my crockpot with a bunch of spices. I always use cumin even when I’m not using black beans. It gives a great smokey flavor.

    Hummus is great baby/toddler food. My 3 year old is in love with it. He has been eating it since he started on solids.

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Hi! My name is Jacquline. Welcome to my blog. I hope you will find some delicious Greek food recipes and enjoy the read along the way! Kali Orexi :)

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